Jasmine Essential Oil

Jasmine Essential Oil

(Jasminum officinale*)

**Jasmine is an absolute or essence, rather than an essential oil.

topical aromatic

Considered to be exotic and romantic, Jasmine supports the skin’s appearance and is used in several Young Living personal care products. The sweet, floral aroma of Jasmine relaxes the mind and boosts self-confidence.

Jasmine absolute is known as the ‘King of Oils’, and its heavy, sweet scent is loved by most people. The flowers release their perfume at dusk, so flowers are picked at night before sunrise.  It takes over 10 lbs of Jasmine flowers to make one 5 ml bottle of oil!  That makes Jasmine an expensive oil, but it doesn’t take much to enjoy this lovely scent and I think you’ll find it’s well worth the extra expense.

jasmine

Jasmine has been used throughout history for attraction and balancing the feminine energy of the body. It is a middle note in perfumery, and is a perfect addition to your feminine arsenal.

How to use: For aromatic or topical use.  Diffuse, inhale, or add to bath water.  Apply to crown of head, back of neck, behind ears or inside wrists.  Possible skin sensitivity.

  1. Make your own perfume and create a signature scent!
  2. Apply to cotton balls and place in air vents in  your home or car.
  3. Add to your favorite beauty products to beautify skin and hair.
  4. Mix with epsom slat and add to the bath to create a luxurious nighttime ritual.
  5. Diffuse in the evening to create a sulty, romantic atmosphere.  Try combining 2 drops of Jasmine with 2 drops of Eucalyptus Globulus and 2 drop of Peppermint for a lovely springtime blend!

spring blossom

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*Disclaimer: I provide my personal opinion and experiences with essential oils, and I am not endorsed by the Young Living Corporation. None of what I talk about on this site has been evaluated by the FDA, nor is it intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. I am not a registered physician and I encourage you to discuss your health concerns with your own doctor. I simply share resources and tools based on my own personal experiences.

Bergamot essential oil

Bergamot

(Citrus bergamia)

Bergamot essential oil is used aromatically and topically  while Bergamot Vitality essential oil is a dietary oil and therefore can be ingested.

Like most citrus oils, Bergamot oil is cold pressed from the rind of the fruit. It is unique among citrus oils due to its ability to be both uplifting and calming, making it ideal to diffuse at work or school. A hybrid of a bitter orange and a sweet lemon, the scent of bergamot essential oil is similar to a sweet light orange peel oil with a floral tone and is a common top note in perfumes.

How to use: For aromatic or topical use.  Diffuse, inhale, or add to bath water.  Apply to crown of head, back of neck, behind ears or inside wrists.  Possible skin sensitivity.  Warning: Phototoxic.  Avoid direct sunlight or UV rays for up to 12 hours after applying product.

  1. Diffuse alone or with other citrus or crisp smelling oils such as tangerine, orange, grapefruit, Rosemary, or Tea Tree for a refreshing aromatic experience.
  2. Add to your skin care products to support healthy looking skin.  Works great with oily skin!  Be careful as Bergamot can be photosensitive.
  3. Bergamot essential oil’s citrus aroma is both empowering and light, making it perfect for both men and women as a refreshing personal scent.
  4. A popular top note, Bergamot is the perfect addition to making your own personal scent.  Click HERE to learn how to make your own perfume using essential oils.
  5. Due to it’s calming properties, Bergamot is a wonderful oil to diffuse at work or at school.
  6. Mix with epsom salt and add to a bath at the end of the day to promote a calming environment before bedtime.
  7. Use in a sugar scrub to help your feet look happy and healthy all summer long.

 

Foot scrub

Sugar Scrub

  • ¼ cup + 2 T V-6 Vegetable Oil Complex
  • 5 drops Bergamot
  • 3 drops Lavender
  • 2 drops Royal Hawaiian Sandalwood
  • 2 drops Wintergreen
  • ¾ cup raw sugar

In a small bowl, mix V-6 oil with essential oils. Add mixture to raw sugar in a larger bowl and combine thoroughly. Store in an airtight jar.

When applying in the bath, you may want to use a pumice stone to speed up the exfoliation process; however, avoid scrubbing your calluses raw or removing them altogether. Remember, they are there to protect your feet. Simply buff them smooth and avoid any cuts or lacerations that could invite infection.

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or

Click HERE to order today!

*Disclaimer: I provide my personal opinion and experiences with essential oils, and I am not endorsed by the Young Living Corporation. None of what I talk about on this site has been evaluated by the FDA, nor is it intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. I am not a registered physician and I encourage you to discuss your health concerns with your own doctor. I simply share resources and tools based on my own personal experiences.

Frequencies, Notes and making your own perfumes

I’d like to share some information from across the wires

On Essential Oil Frequencies:

I know less than nothing about Essential Oil frequencies.  But reading these 2 articles I learned a lot.  And now you can too.

There are times when more than one oil is needed to help the body restore proper balance. These oils create a synergy not available in single oils. Oil molecules vibrate at frequencies that match those found in the body. When the body is out of balance, oil blends help the cells resonate at proper frequencies and restore stability.” Read more at http://www.webdeb.com/oils/frequencies.htm and http://isira.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/YL-Essential-Oils-Frequency-LA.pdf and http://www.therosefrequency.com/theScience.html

FrequencyChart

On Essential Oil blending

http://www.aromaweb.com/articles/aromaticblending.asp

Essential oils can be categorized into broad groups based on their aromas. An example categorical system is as follows:

  • Floral
    (i.e. Lavender, Neroli, Jasmine)
  • Woodsy
    (i.e. Pine, Cedar)
  • Earthy
    (i.e. Oakmoss, Vetiver, Patchouli)
  • Herbaceous
    (i.e. Marjoram, Rosemary, Basil)
  • Minty
    (i.e. Peppermint, Spearmint)
  • Medicinal/Camphorous
    (i.e. Eucalyptus, Cajuput, Tea Tree)
  • Spicy
    (i.e. Nutmeg, Clove, Cinnamon)
  • Oriental
    (i.e. Ginger, Patchouli)
  • Citrus
    (i.e. Orange, Lemon, Lime)

This author also suggests that the following oils generally blend well together (though not exclusively):

  • Florals blend well with spicy, citrusy and woodsy oils.
  • Woodsy oils generally blend well with all categories.
  • Spicy and oriental oils blend well with florals, oriental and citrus oils. Be careful not to overpower the blend with the spicy or oriental oils.
  • Minty oils blend well with citrus, woodsy, herbaceous and earthy oils.

on Essential Oil Notes

The “note” of an essential oil is based on how quickly it evaporates.  This is important information when talking about perfumes or aromatherapy because the scent may change over time depending on the notes that are used.

  • Top Note: Your first impression and the scent that will fade the quickest, within 1-2 hours. this should comprise about 50-60% of blend.
  • Middle Note:  the “heart” of the blend. It will fade after 2-4 of hours and should be about 20-40% of blend
  • Base Note: This will be the anchor to your blend and it will be the note that lasts the longest, sometimes days! This should be 5-15% of blend.

You should be VERY HAPPY to have the chart below.  I say that because I did not want to to make this chart.  I searched high and low for someone else to have categorized young living essential oils but could not find it.  I put this together by bits and pieces so save it, pin it, email it to yourself, WHATEVER so you don’t lose it!

EO notes

Generally speaking, when blending oils for a pleasing scent or perfume, you should have a top note, middle note and base note.  for aromatherapy, I like to use what I call the 321 rule.  3 drops of a top note, 2 drops of a middle note and 1 drop base note for 6 drops total.

Do you NEED to have all three?  No.

Will the smell be offensive if I don’t have all three?  No.

Will I lose any therapeutic value if I don’t have all three?  No.

This is just to guide you to make blends that have great therapeutic value AND smell great!

On making perfumes

http://www.essential-oil-recipes.com/instructions-aromatherapy-perfume-recipes.html

Instructions:

  1. Measure 1 teaspoon of your carrier oil (jojoba, almond or apricot kernel) and 1 teaspoon of alcohol (Vodka), using the small funnel, into your bottle.
  2. Add the essential oils from your chosen recipe one drop at a time. You may need to use a dropper if your essential oil jars do not already have dropper measures built in.
  3. Shake the mixture well after adding each drop.
  4. Put the lid on tightly and store in a cool, dark place for a minimum of 12 days shaking at least 3 times each day.
  5. Enjoy!

Sample recipes:

Wedding nerves

  • 4 drops Jasmine
  • 2 drops Lemon
  • 1 drops Patchouli

Poise

  • 2 drops Basil
  • 3 drops Bergamot
  • 1 drop Coriander
  • 4 drops Petitgrain;

Or create your own!

Here are some sample combinations to get you started:

  • Lime, Rose and Vetiver
  • Orange, Lavender, Ylang ylang
  • Bergamot, Lemongrass, Sandalwoodperfume
  • Bergamot, Rose, Jasmine, Sandalwood
  • Lemongrass, Lime, Lavender, Vetiver
  • Orange, Peppermint, Cedarwood
  • Sweet Marjoram, Lavender, Ylang ylang

 

OK, Tell me how to get started

or

Click HERE to order today!

Disclaimer: I provide my personal opinion and experiences with essential oils, and I am not endorsed by the Young Living Corporation. None of what I talk about on this site has been evaluated by the FDA, nor is it intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. I am not a registered physician and I encourage you to discuss your health concerns with your own doctor. I simply share resources and tools based on my own personal experiences.